ARE COMMON ALLERGENS HIDING IN YOUR DOG'S FOOD? 0

ARE COMMON ALLERGENS HIDING IN YOUR DOG'S FOOD?

Research shows that some dog food ingredients are more likely to cause an allergic reaction than others. According to Jean Hofve, DVM in Whole Dog Journal, some of the most common food allergens for dogs are: beef, dairy, wheat, corn, egg, chicken, soy, pork, and white fish—all common ingredients used in premium dog food. Complicating matters it the fact that dog foods typically contain more than one these ingredients in any given formula (so there is the risk of multiple reactions).

Dogs with food allergies/sensitivities can experience a number of health problems after consuming ingredients they are allergic or sensitive to including: scratching, paw biting, ear infections, loose stools, and even vomiting. It is VERY common for dogs with these problems to be allergic to more than one ingredient. As a result, it is important to read the ingredient listing on the label carefully before feeding your dog.

WHY THIS MATTERS:

Dogs with food allergies/sensitivities can experience all of the problems noted above. In some extreme cases, the reaction can be so severe that the dog might even have to be euthanized. Furthermore, the process of identifying a food allergy can be costly and time-consuming, but once the offending ingredients are identified, many dogs experience a full recovery.

Here are some options for pet parents trying to identify or prevent a dog food sensitivity or allergy:

  • Elimination feeding – removing ingredients from a diet that are common allergens (wheat, chicken, whitefish, etc.) by feeding different dog foods. COAST+RANGE foods are good for elimination diets because they contain such a limited number of ingredients.
  • Request allergy testing at your vet or from a reputable third party like Nutrascan.
  • Try a rotational diet and switch your dog’s food every 3-4 months to help prevent the development of a food sensitivity from repetitive feeding.

Sources:

  1. Dr. Jean Dodds’ Blog, August 28, 2017
  2. AHVMA Journal, Volume 49 Winter 2017/2018 Scientific Report, Diagnosis of Canine Food Sensitivity and Intolerance Using Saliva: Report of Outcomes

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